Tag: bathroom tiles

bathroom tiles design & ideas

Uncommon tips for your bathroom tiles

Uncommon tips for your bathroom tiles

It might be difficult to choose bathroom tiles for a tiny bathroom, whether for the walls or the flooring. But don’t worry, we’ve got lots of advice to help you make the best decision possible. Below, we’ve compiled our bathroom design expertise to help you figure out which bathroom tiles you’ll need. We’ve got you covered on everything from the optimum tile size for your floor to what will fit with your walls to just add to the sensation of space.

What is the most appropriate tile size for a tiny bathroom?

Myths about little bathroom tiles are debunked!

What is the most appropriate tile size for a tiny bathroom?

Myth 1: Small tiles should not be used.

Smaller bathroom tiles may be too busy in a small bathroom, but if you’ve discovered some little bathroom tiles you like, go ahead and use them! Use smaller tiles for smaller spaces (shower, backsplash, alcoves) and larger bathroom tiles for larger areas.

Myth 2: Only light-colored tiles should be used.

Although we all know that lighter colors make a room seem larger and brighter, it doesn’t mean you shouldn’t use darker colors in smaller areas. As the constraints become less evident, a dark tile may create a feeling of depth and, like a brighter tile, can make a room appear larger.

Myth #3: Stay away from crowded patterns.

While we wouldn’t advise going all the way to the ceiling on every wall, patterned bathroom tiles can have a place in a tiny bathroom. Simply add design to one wall, a backsplash, or the whole floor, and leave the rest plain. Click here to read about Using these DIY tips to install your bathroom tiles.

Despite popular belief, tile size is not influenced by the size of the bathroom. A huge tile may really help a tiny bathroom. The walls and floor are less congested with fewer grout lines, and the space seems to be larger.

Using smaller bathroom tiles, such as mosaics, can result in a lot of grout lines, giving the bathroom walls a grid-like look that will make you feel boxed in, making your bathroom seem even smaller.

However, this does not rule out the possibility of using tiny bathroom tiles. If you’ve fallen in love with some lovely mosaics, you can mix it up a little by using different sized tiles in different zones of your bathroom, with smaller bathroom tiles limited to the showering area, a larger format tile used in the majority of the room, and mosaic tiles in alcoves or recesses (areas you don’t expect to feel generously-sized).

It’s difficult to know what size tile would work in a tiny bathroom by looking at it on a tile store shelf, so ask for samples (a couple to put out on a sample board if you can) to see them in action.

Are you planning on tiling a bathroom wall yourself? This is perhaps the ideal moment to highlight that we have a really simple step-by-step tutorial to assist you.

Is it important how the tiles are laid out?

Is it important how the tiles are laid out?

Laying your bathroom tiles in diagonal patterns in tiny bathrooms is a brilliant technique that fools the eye into thinking the space is larger than it is. When you look at conventional squares alternatives, counting them is rather simple, but when you arrange them diagonally, your attention is pulled to the room’s longest dimensions. Popular chevron designs are great for this.

If you don’t like the look of a diagonal tile pattern, try putting your bathroom tiles in a brick bond. This is a common option for metro bathroom tiles, and it helps to reduce the grid pattern impression, which may emphasize a room’s restricted width and height.

Make sure to have a look at our other bathroom-improvement ideas as well.

What color tiles should you choose in a tiny bathroom?

It’s a well-known fact that brighter colors make a tiny room seem larger, so keep that in mind when choosing the proper tile size for a small bathroom. Choosing lighter colors for your bathroom tiles, such as white or cream, will assist reflect more light than darker colors.

Another tip for finding the correct bathroom tiles for a tiny bathroom is to go for glossy, metallic, or mother-of-pearl finish tiles, which will improve the area by reflecting light and creating the illusion of larger dimensions.

However, don’t be afraid of dark colors; they may be utilized to create a feeling of depth in a room, either across the area or on the walls as a pencil line around the room’s breadth, making it seem longer and broader.

For a tiny bathroom, should you go with patterned or plain tiles?

Which one should you pick? Patterned bathroom tiles, particularly busy ones, will undoubtedly make walls seem to advance optically, making a bathroom appear smaller. If you want to add character with patterned tiles, place them below the dado rail height and use simple, light-colored bathroom tiles above. This strategy will drive the eye above and across the space, making it seem bigger and lighter.

In a tiny bathroom, where should you tile?

If a tiny bathroom is tiled from floor to ceiling and wall to wall, it might appear cold and clinical, but you should try for as much ornamental flow as possible to increase the sense of space in the room. To put it another way, if the arrangement of the fixtures and fittings means that there will only be short gaps of painted wall between, instance, a bath backsplash and a basin splashback, it’s preferable to tile the whole length of the wall and minimize the tiling levels adjustments than to interrupt the tiling.

If you’re tiling the bulk of your walls, choose a bathroom floor tile that isn’t too matchy-matchy. Is it possible to have a bathroom with just white bathroom tiles? Strange sensations. Choose a patterned floor tile to contrast with your wall tiles (or vice versa); our portfolio is full of intriguing patterned tiles.

For a tiny bathroom, selecting the proper tile materials is crucial.

Natural stone possibilities for tiny bathroom tiles include travertine, marble, limestone, slate, and granite, each with its unique natural qualities. Slate is ideal for bathrooms because of its low porosity and non-slip riven texture, while marble, travertine, and limestone may be polished to a high sheen for a spectacular finish but need sealing. Check out our guide for additional information on selecting natural stone flooring.

Ceramic and porcelain bathroom tiles are often a cheaper manufactured choice, with a wide selection of finishes to choose from. From stone and even wood-like finishes to brilliant colors, ornamental patterns, high glosses, and raised printing, there’s something for everyone. More ideas and suggestions for selecting ceramic and porcelain bathroom tiles may be found on our website.

Mosaics, whether made of stone, glass, or ceramic, provide a touch of elegance to little places, such as behind the basin, and give the impression that they have been lovingly set. They’re also available in sheets, making installation a breeze.

Use these DIY tips to install your bathroom tiles

Use these DIY tips to install your bathroom tiles

Today, we’ll discuss a bathroom renovation difficulty that may look to the ordinary Joe to be oh-so-simple, but let’s be honest: Because you and I aren’t typical Joes, picking bathroom tile may be a difficult task – particularly when costs are involved, which, let’s face it, they almost always are.

Take it from someone who has been searching, comparing, ordering, feeling, measuring, tasting, and fantasizing over tiles for the last two weeks: When you have millions of bathroom tiles alternatives to pick from, deciding on one or two is a difficult task.

So, without further ado, here are a few things I’ve learned about bathroom tiles so far. I hope you find these recommendations helpful if you ever decide to do your own bathroom makeover. You may always go back to this article to remind yourself that if I can accomplish it, so can you!

Girl, you’ve got it!

FIRST AND FOREMOST, DO YOUR HOMEWORK.

The following are the most prevalent varieties of bathroom tiles when it comes to materials:

Tile made of ceramic: Ceramic tile is one of the most affordable solutions, and it’s ideal for wet areas like the bathroom. It’s simple to set up and maintain, and it’s usually one of the simplest solutions. Just make sure you’ve done a slip test on a sample if you’re using a high-gloss ceramic alternative.

Use these DIY tips to install your bathroom tiles

Tile made of glass: Glass bathroom tiles are a popular choice for the backsplash because it adds flair and depth to any area. It is often more costly than ceramic ones. Keep in mind the slip-resistance element, like with high-gloss ceramic tile; glass tile is more slippery owing to its smooth surface, so use it on the walls instead of the flooring.

Stone tile: If you want a more natural look, go for stone tile. Keep in mind that most stone tiles aren’t waterproof, so they’ll need to be treated correctly to survive. Marble bathroom tiles, for example, is a more costly alternative that provides a rich vibe to the area, but it’s also high-maintenance since it cracks, stain, and scratch quickly.

Porcelain tile is a kind of ceramic bathroom tile that comes in a variety of Porcelain tile is also one of the more costly alternatives, but it offers a worry-free experience, making it one of the most popular choices on the market today. It absorbs extremely little water because of its hard and durable surface, making it an ideal bathroom material. However, installation is a difficult task, so leave it to the pros.

There are simply too many alternatives to cover in terms of form, pattern, or arrangement, however, the following are some of the most prevalent patterns. Click here to read about Consider these benefits and tips when selecting herringbone tiles.

Use these DIY tips to install your bathroom tiles

TRY A SAMPLE BEFORE BUYING

Customers are probably aware of my Wayfair infatuation, so imagine my joy when I discovered that the home design and renovation giant allows you to purchase FREE tile samples.

Yes, you read it correctly: FREE tile samples!

Even if you’re not buying your bathroom tile from Wayfair, some home improvement stores, such as Home Depot or Lowes, will let you buy samples for a few dollars, which is still a far better option than buying a hundred square feet of black bathroom tiles only to discover that it makes your powder room appear teeny-tiny – or, even worse, buying a hundred square feet of super shiny bathroom tiles only to discover that super shiny is synonymous with super slippery (read: not ideal for a shower).

You can obtain a good feel of whether the bathroom tiles suit the room design, double-check the size, and soak-test the tiles for quality control by sampling before purchase.

In the spirit of sampling, I’ve included two of my favorite marble herringbone samples from Wayfair, each of which cost more than $20 per square foot. However, as demonstrated by several of your Instagram comments, it seems that this design is a favorite of many. Visit http://artofthearcade.com/uncommon-tips-for-your-bathroom-tiles/ to read about Uncommon tips for your bathroom tiles.

SELECT YOUR TOP THREE OPTIONS

It’s time to start narrowing down what you want once you’ve read the reviews and tried out the numerous samples. If you’re anything like me (read: absolutely naive about tile), you’re probably thinking about what else has to be tiled except the shower. While there is no ultimate right or wrong answer (it is your home, after all), most people tile the shower, the floor, the area around the tub, and potentially a statement wall, which is generally the wall behind the bathroom vanity. If you don’t want to wind up with a kaleidoscope of patterns instead of a fashionable, well-designed bathroom, just because there are four separate rooms doesn’t imply you need four bathroom tiles selections.

The trick is to limit yourself to three tile selections. To add a little of a wow element to the area, choose one statement tile with a distinctive form, texture, or color, such as Moroccan (also known as arabesque). Opt for more basic alternatives in the same color palette for the other rooms to prevent the space from feeling too fashionable.

USE A LIGHT COLOR PALETTE TO MAXIMIZE THE SPACE

In terms of color scheme: Using light and neutral colors in the bathroom, like in any other room in the home, optimizes the space. It’s a quick and easy approach to give the impression of being more costly. Keep things from becoming too monotonous by using varied textures of the same color to provide depth.

Another fantastic approach to maximize space – while not the most cost-effective – is to tile the walls all the way up to the ceiling. Floor-to-ceiling tiling lengthens the space, giving the impression that it is much larger than it is. Consider extending the bathroom tiles just on one feature wall to get the fashionable European appearance without having to tile the whole bathroom, which may be costly.

MEASURE EVERYTHING AND REMEASURE IT

After you’ve decided on the material, color, and pattern you want to use, it’s time to tackle the not-so-fun part of the process: calculating how much your options will cost you. Measure the length and breadth of the area you’ll be covering with tile, then multiply the two numbers. Add 10-15% to your estimate to account for breakage and emergencies, as nothing is more frustrating than nearly finishing a tiling project only to discover that you still need a few square feet of a tile that has since been discontinued (speaking from personal experience, though I have heard horror stories!).

Check out: 10+ Helpful Tips For Creating Bright Living Room Ideas